Photos and privacy: Say cheese!!

I was sat reading my book in a roof top bar in London.   The evening was drawing in and it had been a long day in travelling down to London, walking for around an hour from the train station to the hotel in which I was to be staying, and then getting checked in and settled.

As I sat there reading my book I saw a flash out of the side of my eye, from the phone in the hands of the gentleman sat to my right.    Had he just taken a photo?    Was his phone camera directed at me?  If so why?

As we use our devices more and more, including using them in public, there is an increasing chance of accidentally invading someone else’s privacy, of taking a picture of someone without their permission.   This photo may then go on to be shared on social media.

When I used to work out in the UAE I would often spend holiday periods sat by the beach in Abu Dhabi, and like my incident in London, would quite often feature in the holiday snaps of other people visiting the beach.     These holiday snaps would most likely then get uploaded to Facebook or other social media sites where facial recognition might attempt to tag me in photos that I was otherwise unaware that I was in.   There now was a public record of my holiday activities yet I hadn’t created it and may not even be aware of its existence.

Looking at the above incidents from the viewpoint of the person taking the photo there comes a point where we need to ask permission or to warn people before we take a photo.    This wasn’t the case when our photos had to be developed from film and when sharing was limited to showing friends and relatives the photo album you have gathered.   Now photos are digital and can easily be shared online, copied and even amended and adjusted this has become more important.   The question though is when is it acceptable to capture people in a photo by accident and when should we be asking permission?

From the point of view of the person ending up in a photo we have to ask whether we are happy to end up in someone else’s photo that may be shared.    As professionals would we be happy for photos of birthday party antics being online for people to find?    This leads to the difficult situation of having to speak to people taking photos to question their motives and intended use of images.   This does not generally come naturally to us as it often involves addressing strangers.

The increasingly common use of photography due to the ease of use brought about by high definition cameras built into our mobile phones presents a challenge.    The benefits of taking more photos, more photographic records of events, which are then shared versus the risk to personal privacy.

Do you tend towards the need for privacy or the benefits of taking lots of photos?

As facial recognition, big data and AI improve does this become more of an issue?

Author: garyhenderson2014

Gary Henderson is currently the Director of IT in an Independent school in the UK. Prior to this he worked as the Head of Learning Technologies working with public and private schools across the Middle East. This includes leading the planning and development of IT within a number of new schools opening in the UAE. As a trained teacher with over 15 years working in education his experience includes UK state secondary schools, further education and higher education, as well as experience of various international schools teaching various curricula. This has led him to present at a number of educational conferences in the Middle East. In addition Gary is a Google and Microsoft Certified Educator.

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